Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design

Hillersdon House was designed by theatrical architect Samuel Beazley in 1849 for the arctic explorer Billy Grant. There are many wonderful stories about the lavish and decadent goings on from this period – mostly involving the world’s first ‘It’ girl Elinor Glyn. Hence the ditty: “Would you like to sin with Elinor Glyn on a tiger skin? Or would you prefer to err with her on some other fur?”

Tom and his team have been working here for three years with much of the main works nearly completed. All of the existing lakes are restored to their existing profiles linked by an extended version of the historical rhododendron walk that once was here. The owner has sited Isis, a three metre tall bronze Simon Gudgeon sculpture on the largest lake.

Tucked away, nestled amongst rhododendrons is a rustic temple made using local cob and estate timber. Antlers from the Hillersdon herd that roams the 200 acres were used as ornamentation.

A large lawn and haha further accentuate the view towards Cullompton church and the Blackdown Hills beyond, comfortably anchoring the house within the landscape.

The next phase is to restore the three-acre walled garden into a productive yet ornamental garden working with the dynamic head gardener, Graham Burton.

Hillersdon House was designed by theatrical architect Samuel Beazley in 1849 for the arctic explorer Billy Grant. There are many wonderful stories about the lavish and decadent goings on from this period – mostly involving the world’s first ‘It’ girl Elinor Glyn. Hence the ditty: “Would you like to sin with Elinor Glyn on a tiger skin? Or would you prefer to err with her on some other fur?”

Tom and his team have been working here for three years with much of the main works nearly completed. All of the existing lakes are restored to their existing profiles linked by an extended version of the historical rhododendron walk that once was here. The owner has sited Isis, a three metre tall bronze Simon Gudgeon sculpture on the largest lake.