Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design and Cambridge Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2010

For his return to Chelsea in 2010, Tom took his influence from the world of literature.

Inspired by the 18th century satirical masterpiece Candide by French author Voltaire, he designed a Mediterranean-style garden to represent the ill-fated travels of Candide as he journeyed around the world, across oceans and rapids, in search of his lost love.

The garden was designed in a grid-like pattern suggestive of the fields of the Turkish smallholding depicted in the final scenes of the book. The book concludes with Candide musing, ‘il faut cultiver nôtre jardin’ or ‘we must cultivate our garden’.

To symbolise the oceans that Candide crosses in his travels, Tom incorporated two pools of water on either side of the garden. The pools were linked by a specially-commissioned scalloped flow form sculpture which formed the centrepiece of the space. The flow form forces the rill to create sparkling, diamond-shaped white water.

For his return to Chelsea in 2010, Tom took his influence from the world of literature.

Inspired by the 18th century satirical masterpiece Candide by French author Voltaire, he designed a Mediterranean-style garden to represent the ill-fated travels of Candide as he journeyed around the world, across oceans and rapids, in search of his lost love.

The garden was designed in a grid-like pattern suggestive of the fields of the Turkish smallholding depicted in the final scenes of the book. The book concludes with Candide musing, ‘il faut cultiver nôtre jardin’ or ‘we must cultivate our garden’.