Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016
Thomas Hoblyn Suffolk Garden Design Chelsea Flower Show 2016

Photographs © Helen Fickling and Charlie Hopkinson


This May Tom brought a Tamil Nadu-inspired kitchen garden to the Discovery Zone at RHS Chelsea for the not-for-profit organisation Lifeworks Global.

The Lifeworks Global Garden depicted a life-changing environmental solution for the impoverished villages of Tamil Nadu in Southern India. The garden showed how organic farming practices, traditional crop production and water filtering techniques can help rid families of malnutrition and replenish natural resources in the region.

Designed as a kitchen garden, it sat within a distressed architectural frame, representing a typical Tamil Nadu village home. The frame was teeming with vibrant vegetation to show how the regeneration of the area comes from the people within the home. Whilst the weathered structure signified the prevailing poverty, the exuberant planting bursting from within was symbolic of the land’s potential rejuvenation.

Lofty orange jasmine and mango trees set amongst a towering sugar palm indicated the importance of introducing new trees to the region to provide shade, encourage rainfall and improve the micro-climate, whilst traditional crops such as chillies, ginger and tomatoes symbolised the powerful alternatives to the harmful ‘cash crops’ that have dominated the province and depleted the land in recent years.

Paul Manweiller, Founder of Lifeworks Global said: “The Lifeworks Global Garden is a powerful demonstration of how simple, organic principles, natural farming methods and low-cost water filtering systems can have a dramatic effect on the Tamil Nadu region. By providing local communities with seeds, basic tools and knowledge of organic techniques for growing their own food, enriching the soil and filtering water we can empower them to really transform their lives.  It is a sustainable solution that is working for both the community and the environment with results showing increased crop yields and quality and reduced costs, water use and pollution.”

This May Tom brought a Tamil Nadu-inspired kitchen garden to the Discovery Zone at RHS Chelsea for the not-for-profit organisation Lifeworks Global.

The Lifeworks Global Garden depicted a life-changing environmental solution for the impoverished villages of Tamil Nadu in Southern India. The garden showed how organic farming practices, traditional crop production and water filtering techniques can help rid families of malnutrition and replenish natural resources in the region.

Designed as a kitchen garden, it sat within a distressed architectural frame, representing a typical Tamil Nadu village home. The frame was teeming with vibrant vegetation to show how the regeneration of the area comes from the people within the home. Whilst the weathered structure signified the prevailing poverty, the exuberant planting bursting from within was symbolic of the land’s potential rejuvenation. Lofty orange jasmine and mango trees set amongst a towering sugar palm indicated the importance of introducing new trees to the region to provide shade, encourage rainfall and improve the micro-climate, whilst traditional crops such as chillies, ginger and tomatoes symbolised the powerful alternatives to the harmful ‘cash crops’ that have dominated the province and depleted the land in recent years.

On an area of bare soil either side of the house, characteristic of the barren, over-farmed soil that existed before the intervention of the new farming principles, sat a GrifAid family Aquafilter – a low-cost water filtering system that is helping to transform the region.